Be part of the solution

The stark truth is that stopping the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere isn’t enough to keep global warming below two degrees Celsius. We also need to remove some of what’s already there. Don’t just take our word for it: over 100 of 116 scenarios that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has analysed involve carbon removal schemes.

The only solutions that exist today on the large scale needed for scrubbing carbon from the atmosphere are nature-based, such as planting trees.

We don’t need to invent alternative technologies to trees; we need to be inventive in how we grow millions of trees in the UK.

We are familiar with the idea of planting more trees to help combat climate change. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, removing and storing carbon in the form of wood while releasing oxygen back into the air. They also cool the air as they lose moisture and reflect heat upwards from their leaves.

At The Carbon Community in Cynghordy, Wales, they are taking a new science-led approach to reforestation to increase carbon sequestration in trees and soil. In a landmark project near the Brecon Beacons, the team is combining two nature-based solutions in a field trial never previously deployed together at scale, to demonstrate how to capture more carbon more quickly while planting the same number of trees.

The ‘Tiny Forest’ campaign by Earthwatch Europe is an innovative urban tree planting project with the aim of reconnecting people with nature and providing a new nature-rich habitat to support urban wildlife. Each tiny forest is a dense, fast-growing woodland consisting of 600 trees and shrubs planted in an area the size of a tennis court. As more communities and partners get on board, this campaign is well on its way to establishing 150 tiny forests across the UK before the end of the 2023 planting season.

Do you have space for a tiny forest in your neighbourhood to draw down more greenhouse gases and freshen the air locally? There are over 7000 villages, towns and cities in the UK. Almost every one of them has at least one location where a patch of green space could fit or a patch of plain grass where more trees could grow.